Ernst Schade

 
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Porto
 
8 Mar 2021
58 files
Located along the Douro River estuary in northern Portugal, Porto is one of the oldest European centres, and its core was proclaimed a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1996. Porto or Oporto is the second-largest city in Portugal and one of the Iberian Peninsula's major urban areas.
 
Recycling of animals in Portugal
 
5 Jul 2019
19 files
SEMAPA is one of the largest Portuguese industrial groups and is active in various sectors such as paper and cement. The group concentrates on environmentally friendly production with a special focus on recycling and is a leader in this field in Portugal.~~Abapor-ETSA, a division of SEMAPA, focuses on the processing of dead animals and waste from slaughterhouses as well as on supermarket products that have reached their expiry date. Annually 120,000 tons of waste and rejected food are processed. Of the end products, 48% is exported.~~The Abapor recycling plant processes carcasses of cows, pigs, goats, sheep and other (domestic) animals. After veterinary inspection, cows, pigs, sheep and goats are skinned. The skins of the highest quality are delivered to the leather industry in Portugal and Italy. The carcasses are burned, the animal fat provides biodiesel and biomass so the factory runs entirely on self-produced energy. The blood is processed into fertilizer.
 
Passed the sell-by date
 
5 Jul 2019
22 files
What is happening in Portugal with food products that have passed their sell-by date? The Abapor recycling plant receives food products from supermarkets across the country. Workers manually separate plastics, packaging material, meat, bread, fish and dairy products into different containers. The subsequent recycling process provides ingredients for dog and cattle feed, organic cooking oil and manure, as well as cosmetics and proteins.~~SEMAPA is one of the largest Portuguese industrial groups and is active in various sectors such as paper and cement. The group concentrates on environmentally friendly production with a special focus on recycling and is a leader in this field in Portugal.~~Abapor-ETSA, a division of SEMAPA, focuses on the processing of dead animals and waste from slaughterhouses as well as on supermarket products that have reached the end of their shelf life. Annually 120,000 tons of waste and rejected food are processed. Of the end products, 48% is exported.
 
Fatima
 
2 Mar 2017
19 files
Paus Franciscus zal op 12 en 13 mei een bezoek brengen aan het Portugese bedevaartsoord Fatima. Daar wordt plechtig herdacht dat precies een eeuw geleden Maria aan drie herderskinderen verscheen.
 
Decriminalizing Drugs in Portugal
 
20 Dec 2016
16 files
Portugal struggled with a huge drug problem for a long time. In 1999, 1 percent of the population was addicted to heroin. The country had the highest number of drug-related HIV deaths in Europe. In 2001 Portugal decided to decriminalizing all drug use. The possession of small amounts of drugs has since been not legal, but it is also no longer a criminal offense. Drug use is seen as a health problem. Drug users are not subsequently arrested but must appear before a special committee where a doctor, a lawyer and a social worker prescribe treatment or give a penalty. The number of heroin addicts has been reduced by 70 percent. Partly as a result, the number of thefts, AIDS patients and drug deaths fell sharply.
 
Children of Africa
 
8 Nov 2016
19 files
 
 
Urban Exploration
 
1 Jul 2016
32 files
 
 
By land, sea and air
 
2 Mar 2016
46 files
 
 
Portraits
 
2 Feb 2016
55 files
 
 
Salt production Guinee-Bissau
 
9 Nov 2015
13 files
Guinea-Bissau, not even half the size of Scotland, on the west coast of Africa. Independent from Portugal since 1974 and ever since, torn apart by internal political disputes that brought the country close to bankruptcy. Abounding in water with mangrove forest along the coast and a couple of bigger rivers that run from the African hinterland to the Atlantic Ocean.~~With a shaky ferryboat we cross the River Cacheu near the small town of Farim. Dew is falling over the river. On the other shore, women with pans full of salt wait patiently to cross.~~The women of Guinea-Bissau, they keep the country going. They haul water for the vegetable gardens and sell the harvest at the market. One hour up to the ferry, one hour down. They cook and take care of the children. And the men of Guinea? They only seem to stand about, engaged in some unclear business, praying and waiting in the shadow for the cooler afternoon.~~We get a lift in an open truck. On the outer marches of the river, groups of women and children are scraping silt from the surface. “What are these people doing?”, we ask our guide. “The silt has a high contents of salt”, he anwers. Salt? Here? 150 kilometres inland? The outer marches turn out to be the former bolanhas, rice fields that were irrigated, in those days, with fresh water from the river. But, because less and less fresh water ran down from inland, the salty waters from the ocean pressed onwards. Consequently, the rice fields disappeared and the main source of income was lost.~But, the inventive women of the village with the strange name of ‘K3 ‘ made a virtue of necessity: the silt is carried home, a 20 minutes walk. Then they filter it with water from a 15 metre deep well, dug by them. The residue is then boiled in huge, flat, metal pans, made from material left behind by the Portuguese colonial army. Each boiling session produces around six kilo of high quality salt.~~The village ‘K3’ is famous in the whole country. In former days, it accommodated important army barracks of the Portuguese (at three kilometres from Farim, hence K3!). Alapdji Fode Mai Touré is the Homem Grande, the traditional chief. At least 90 years old. Fluent in Arabic. He is in session with the elderly men on the veranda of his house. Touré is a legendary figure and tells: how his tabanka, village, opposed the Portuguese, never paid their taxes and supplied the guerilla fighters against the colonial regime with shelter and food. This resistance had its price: 250 men were deported and never returned.~~Under the leadership of Djombo Fode Touré (the daughter of the Homem Grande, the religious local leader), the women of ‘K3’ organized themselves in an Asssociação de Sal, an association which made them a corporate body. In the capital of Bissau, Djombo managed to get hold of some funds from a development organization and used those well in the purchase of a machine that adds iodine to the salt. Essential to prevent the much feared crop disease.~~Nowadays, the association produces yearly around 5000 kilos of salt that is very popular in the markets of Bissau. And so, after the disaster of the destroyed rice cultivation, about 25 families have found a very reasonable source of income. “Do not count on others, simply trust your own strength”, Djombo told us. The women of Guinea, they keep the country going.
 
Sculptors of Tengenenge
 
5 Nov 2015
16 files
 
 
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